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10 Of The Best And Strongest Gods In Smite

Looking for the updated 2020 Smite tier list? Here is our list of 10 of the best and strongest gods in Smite. Including the new god Cthulhu, the Smite roster features popular characters (Mulan, Thor), OP mages (Aphrodite, Persephone), and annoying gods we just love to hate (Loki, Ah Puch).

1. Heimdallr

All paths have their guardians. And no guardian is more steadfast in their duties than keen-eyed Heimdallr, sentinel of the Bifrost. The watchman of Asgard is a sentry without equal in the Nine Realms and he maintains his eternal watch where the rainbow bridge meets the sky. With sharp eyes and keen hearing, Heimdallr stands guard over the halls of the gods, alert for the approach of any enemy as well as the first stirrings of Ragnarok.

It is said that Heimdallr requires less sleep than a bird, and can see for hundreds of leagues. His hearing is so sharp that he can perceive the soft whisper of growing grass, and the murmur of the dead. His trumpet, Gjallarhorn, can be heard across the Nine Worlds when blown. But it is not only his senses which make Heimdallr a superb sentinel.

He also possesses the gift of foresight, allowing him to predict his opponent’s moves before they occur and to sense the approach of inimical forces. As befitting one of the Aesir, he is a masterful combatant, and his foreknowledge gives him an edge over all but the most unpredictable – or skilled – of opponents.

Too, it is whispered that Heimdallr has some connection to Yggdrasil, the World Tree. Some insist he was fashioned whole from a splinter of the great ash tree, while others believe he is bound to it in some fashion, much like Ratatoskr. Whatever the case, it is known that Heimdallr takes a dim view of any who might threaten Yggdrasil.

Thus, when his keen gaze settled upon the creeping tendrils of Persephone’s minions, drawing ever closer to the World Tree, Heimdallr moved instantly to confront them. Powerful as she was, even the Queen of the Underworld could not hide her intentions from the watchman of Asgard.

2. Hades

Inevitably, death sends everyone to Hades, God of the Underworld. In the end, he always gets his way.

Eldest son of the Titans Cronus and Rhea, Hades was swallowed by his father as an infant along with five other siblings. Zeus, the youngest brother, escaped this fate and freed them once he’d grown strong enough to battle Cronus. Together, the six siblings defeated the Titans and banished them to the dark realm of Tartarus. Now the reigning Gods, Zeus, Poseidon, and Hades drew lots for dominion. Hades drew the Underworld.

Of the few that have entered the Underworld and come back, all speak dismally of the place, never wishing to return. Yet Hades, himself, rarely leaves the subterranean realm, constantly seeking ways to grow the numbers of the dead.

When he desired a wife, Hades captured the radiant Persephone, daughter of the Goddess Demeter. Concealed in the Underworld, none could reach her, so Demeter cursed the land with a great famine. The other Gods pleaded with her to end it lest she destroy mankind, but she would not relent until her daughter was returned. Hades finally let Persephone leave, though not before feeding her pomegranate seeds. Having consumed the fruit, she was bound forever to Hades and required to return to her husband once per year to eat of the seeds again. This, it is said, is a time of mourning and the cause of winter.

While many fear death and view it as evil, in truth, Hades endeavors only to keep balance. He is stern but fair. As God of the Dead and the Underworld, he views his authority on this matter absolute, forbidding anyone to leave his realm and growing wrathful when disobeyed or when someone tries to cheat death or steal from him.

For everyone, death is unavoidable and service to Hades inevitable. Even the Gods.

3. Persephone

Persephone is the Goddess of Vegetation and the Harvest. Daughter of Zeus and Demeter, the others gods often felt fit to decide her fate for her. Demeter enrolled her in helping with her Mysteries while Zeus took it upon himself to give her away. Hades, her husband to be, came up from the underworld and took her away. Demeter, saddened by the loss of her daughter and helper, wept and refused to continue bringing life to the earth. Cornered by a dying world, Zeus forced Hades and Persephone to part.

Before leaving the underworld Hades offered her a seed of a Pomegranate grown in the underworld. Persephone was clever. She understood what was being offered. Those who eat the food of the underworld are bound to it and must return. Hades was offering her a choice. A choice she was happy to accept. Every six months Persephone leaves the underworld, soothing Demeter’s grief and bringing life back to the world.

The time has now come for Persephone, Queen of the Underworld, to return and take her throne besides Hades. She has seen the gods struggle against themselves at the expense of those around them. She can no longer watch as droves of mortal souls arrive; their lives cut short while they struggled for each and every victory as the gods they pray to cause their suffering. Soon all gods will see why she is called ‘Clever Persephone’.

4. Agni

There are few elements as destructive or as purifying as fire. Agni, God of Fire, is the embodiment of both of these qualities, with a head for each.

Though the source of his origin warrants debate – for there are many tales of his parentage ranging from two simple sticks rubbed together, to the cosmic energy that made all things at the beginning of time – Agni is a pivotal and important God with many duties to the Pantheon. He is the twin brother to Indra, God of the Heavens and Rains and chief among warriors. Conversely, Agni is chief among priests, acting as messenger between mortals and Gods. Every Hindu ritual and prayer is performed in front of a fire of some kind, so Agni carries the words and sacrifices, traveling between the Earth and the Heavens. He is welcome in every home and every hearth and much beloved by the Faithful.

Through his flames, Agni provides heat and light, but also cleanses impurities. Smoke from his pyres create the air and hold the Heavens aloft. The sun, a source of fire itself, brings life-giving energy to the world, and his lightning streaks the sky during storms.

For all his kindness and service, Agni has two faces. One is the face of kindness and purity, turned towards the people and Gods. His other face, grim and resolute, guides the God of Fire, to play his role in the cosmic cycle of creation and destruction, to burn and blacken all the atrocities of the world to ash.

5. Cthulhu

In his house at R’lyeh, dread Cthulhu waits dreaming. For him the sleep of aeons is as but a momentary stillness, and in his dreams he speaks to those who would listen. He erodes the minds of the weak, and emboldens the mad. The wind gibbers with his voice, and the earth rumbles with his thoughts.

He once ruled where the feeble gods of Earth rule now, and where they now rule he will rule again. For his hand is at their throats, and they see him not. After summer is winter, and after winter, summer. He waits patient and potent, for the stars to be right.

Nor is he alone in his waiting, for there are those who would worship him, hidden in distant wastes and dark places. There they make ready for the time when they will liberate their master from his long sleep with their prayers. Great Cthulhu will awaken to bring the whole of the earth under his sway once more and to teach man new ways to shout and kill.

Now, as the stars move into their foretold conjunctions, and the great tree withers, R’lyeh rises from the sea and great Cthulhu frenzies forth to reassert his ancient dominion. He plants seeds of madness in the minds of the dreamers, and calls to those who would serve him.

The old gods will fall before him as he shatters the chains of reason, and commands lunacy to rush forth upon the world. Kings will be made mad, the mad will become kings and not even the dead will be spared his wrath.

The stars are right. Cthulhu rises.

6. Thor

Thor, as famous as he is bold, is God of the thundering sky. Yet his hammer, Mjolnir is nearly as famous as he is, and Thor will not be parted from it.

Odin, the All-Father, bore many children, but none as well known nor as mighty as Thor, who had the strength to move mountains and the power to call lightning from the sky. Despite these incredible gifts, Thor’s enemies were cunning, bloodthirsty, and numerous. The Frost Giants constantly threatened to invade Asgard requiring every ounce of Thor’s near limitless strength just to keep them at bay. Had the tide truly turned, Asgard might have been destroyed, but a simple prank played by the treacherous Loki ended with the creation of Mjolnir, the legendary hammer, and with it, Thor utterly crushed the Frost Giants.

Sif, Thor’s wife, had hair like rays of sun through a cloudy sky, and Loki, being covetous, secretly sheared it off while she slept. Mad with fury, Thor demanded Loki fix this. So, Loki went to the dwarves of Ivaldi who forged a golden crown that would grow equally golden hair, a spear that never missed its mark, and a ship that would never sink. Proud of his treasures, Loki returned to Thor and the other Gods, gave the crown to Sif, then bragged that no greater items could be forged.

The dwarf Brokk took offense to this and claimed that he and his brother could do better. Loki bet his head they could not. So, Brokk and his brother forged three items, a ring that made a duplicate every nine days, a golden pig that could fly and swim, and the hammer, Mjolnir, with the power to shatter mountains. As each item was forged, Brokk was bitten fiercely by a fly, yet only on the third did he flinch, causing the short handle on the hammer. When they were done, the dwarves took their artifacts before the Gods and decried Loki’s fly disguise. All the Gods agreed that Brokk and his brother had forged greater items. Loki, ever cunning, declared his neck was not part of the bargain, denying them his head.

Mjolnir went to Thor to battle the Frost Giants. Proud and mighty, Thor beat back the evil horde and continues to defend Asgard to this day. With Mjolnir in hand, Thor is an unstoppable force that even other Gods would do well to avoid.

7. Yemoja

Every river must have its beginning, and that beginning is Yemoja. The Goddess of the Ogun River is mother to the Yoruba pantheon, and from her floodwaters sprang the first mortals. She is the mistress of all rivers and the eternal guardian of the ancient mysteries of life itself. Fishermen and sailors seek her blessings, for she is the protector of all who travel on water. Mothers-to-be ask for her aid, for she is the patron spirit of women and governs everything pertaining to the feminine – especially childbirth. After all, who better than the mother of all life to oversee its continuation?

As such, she considers herself the caretaker of all that lives. She cares deeply for all of her children, be they mortal or god, comforting them and cleansing them of their sorrows. At Yemoja’s blessed touch, wounds are healed and sickness is cured.

But even her kindness has its limits and should she be roused to anger, she becomes as violent and as destructive as the most turbulent of floodwaters. All who would dare stand against her are swept aside by her roaring fury. To challenge Yemoja is to challenge the river itself. But like the rivers, Yemoja has ever followed her own course.

She keeps to her spheres of influence and attends only those who seek out her blessings. Content in her solitude, she has maintained her distance from the affairs of the gods, for war does not interest her and she has power enough to suit her. But the advent of Olorun has changed things and even rivers must turn with the will of the heavens.

And now, as her children cry out for aid, the river rises and Yemoja rises with it.

8. Camazotz

In darkness he lurks. Patient as the night in all its silence. For beneath his inverted perch scampers prey. Whether beast, mortal, or God matters not, only satisfying the unquenchable thrum in his veins for the boiling blood of another creature. But there is never enough. There will never be enough. So Camazotz, bat-god, whose bestial form matches that of his nocturnal servants, lurks in the darkness, waiting only to feed.

Once before, when the hero twins, Xbalanque and Hunahpu ventured to the Xibalba, stumbling blindly into the blackness of his cave, did Camazotz defeat a God. Finding themselves surrounded by a swarm of leathery bats, screeching and flapping with frenzied glee, the hero twins cowered and hid, hoping for dawn to light their way out. Patient, as always, Camazotz waited. Hunahpu, unable to hold out, lifted his head from concealment to check for light. Camazotz leapt, sliding through the blackness like a dagger through skin, and snatched Hunahpu’s head from his neck. Victorious, he presented his prize as a trophy to the other underworld Gods. However, come the morning light, Xbalanque fashioned a new head for his brother from a gourd and the two escaped while Camazotz was away.

Long has Camazotz hung from his perch, watching as Gods clash and spill their sweet blood upon the earth. He’s waited, ever watchful, ever patient, for the moment to strike. Now that the moon has risen, and night has come, Camazotz has disappeared into the darkness. When next he’s seen, there will be blood on his fangs.

9. Pele

Pele is the goddess of Fire, of Dance and Wind, of Volcanoes and Violence. Those who worship Pele speak of her as Madame Pele or Tutu Pele, while others know her as Ka wahine ‘ai honua, “the woman who devours the land”. Though she is capable of great acts of destruction, and possesses the temper to provoke such acts, Pele is both destroyer and creator. It was through her mastery over the world’s molten core that she wrought the Hawaiian Islands into being, forging them from the lava that ruptured forth from the mouths of her volcanoes. They are places of immense beauty, lush and brimming with life, and by looking upon and revelling in such beauty, you offer Pele worship.

Born of Kane Milohai, who wrought the earth, sky and heavens, and the Earth goddess Haumea, Pele is one of fourteen children, seven sisters and seven brothers. It is from the enmity between these siblings that Pele arrived in Hawaii, after her exile at the hands of Kane Milohai for her fiery temper and conflict with her sister Namakaokahai, goddess of the Sea. Pursued across the oceans by Namakaikahai, Pele wrought Hawaii into a paradise, making her home within the great calderas of the volcanoes that stand sentinel across the island chain.

To worship Pele is to grant one’s devotion to a goddess of terrible power, one who can shape and render a grand, vibrant world into being at her slightest whim, and burn it to ashes just as quickly. But just as her worshippers are devoted to Pele, she devotes herself to them as a force of divine protection and care. She is a tireless defender of life and the people that dwell upon her islands, and any that seek to threaten them shall surely taste Pele’s fire.

10. Discordia

It is said Rome wasn’t built in a day. Whether the sweeping arches of the Colosseum, the long stretch of the aqueducts, or the power the Servian Wall, none can truly claim they were the origin that “built” Rome. For as mighty as she has become, Rome might have never been were it not for the mischief of the Goddess Discordia.

Once known among the Greeks as Eris, the maligned Goddess of Strife, Discordia craved to unleash her full potential, to unravel the foundations of the mortals and deities that hated her. She found that opportunity through the vanity of others.

Conjuring a golden apple, Eris cast it forth. Upon it read the words ‘for the fairest.’ A phrase that would set Athena, Hera, and Aphrodite against one another. A phrase that would cause Paris to kidnap Menelaus’ wife, Helen. A phrase that would ignite the Trojan War.

As chaos swirled, as cities crumbled, as heroes both Greek and Trojan fell to each other’s blades and Gods grew to loathe one another, no one seemed to wonder from whence the golden apple came. It was masterful! Eventually, the Trojan War reached its peak, and Eris attached herself to the mortal Aeneus. She guided him safely from Troy, across the sea and wilderness, to the place where a new nation would be built. Here, Aeneus founded Rome.

Free of the judgement she wore under the Greeks, bereft of the belittling glares of the other Gods, Eris was remade as Discordia. A Roman Goddess of importance and prominence. Indeed, Rome was not built in a day. It was the culmination of a plan for one Goddess to reinvent herself as more than she ever was.

And all with one golden apple.

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